Latest News

04/01/20 – Updated
Lake Rabon Park Notice
03/22/20 – Updated
COVID-19 Update
12/13/19
Welcome Town of Gray Court Customers
6/27/19
Water Tap Fee Increase Beginning July 1, 2019
6/27/19
Sewer Rates Increase Beginning July 1, 2019
8/15/18
We are hiring new team members!
5/11/18
Free Rain Barrel Workshop Planned at LCWSC
9/2/2015
Old Owings Tank Demolition August 5, 2015

Lake Rabon Park Notice

Posted by on Mar 30, 2020 in GeneralInfo, News, Slider | Comments Off on Lake Rabon Park Notice

Lake Rabon Park Notice

04.01.20: As a result of the increasing health risk associated with the COVID-19 virus, the Laurens County Water and Sewer Commission is closing the Park at Lake Rabon, effective immediately and until further notice.   This decision was made in an effort to protect our employees that work at the Park and to minimize the community spread of the COVID-19 virus.  It is also consistent with the Governor’s Executive Order 2020-16, restricting public access to public waters in South Carolina for the duration of the State of Emergency.

We are sorry that this decision is inconvenient for some but taking these additional steps to minimize the impacts of COVID-19 will better protect the health and safety of our employees and the many visitors that enjoy Lake Rabon on a daily basis.

Thank you and God Bless.  You can find a copy of the Executive Order at the link below. 

https://governor.sc.gov/sites/default/files/Documents/Executive-Orders/2020-03-30%20eFILED%20Executive%20Order%20No.%202020-16%20-%20Emergency%20Access%20Restrictions%20for%20Public%20Beaches%20%26%20Waters%20Due%20to%20COVID-19%20Pandemic.pdf

03.26.20: The Lake Rabon Park will be CLOSED to the public for maintenance beginning Monday, March 30th. We will reopen on Saturday April 4th . As a reminder, the playground, shelters and restrooms remain closed until the end of May. Visitors are still allowed to use the nature trail, boat ramp and fishing pier.

The LCWSC continues to monitor the SCDHEC and CDC websites regarding the growing health risk of the COVID-19 virus. Based on the current exponential trend of positive cases in our State, the LCWSC may choose to completely close the Park at Lake Rabon in the near future.

We will notify the public via Facebook and our website if this decision is made. Thank You.

COVID-19 Update

Posted by on Mar 15, 2020 in GeneralInfo, News | Comments Off on COVID-19 Update

COVID-19 Update

In an effort to protect our employees and to minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the Laurens County Water and Sewer Commission (LCWSC) is closing its office to the public effective immediately.  During this time, you can continue to pay your bill online, by phone, by mail or at our drive thru.  For all other customer service needs, including signing up for service please call our office at (864) 682-3250 or email us at contact@lcwsc.com.  We understand that this decision may create an inconvenience for some, but we ask for your patience and understanding during this time. 

We do not expect these proactive steps or the COVID-19 to have an impact on our ability to provide water and sewer service to our customers.  As stated in our previous post, the disinfection and filtration process used in treating drinking water destroys and removes all viruses as required by the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency; therefore, your public water supply continues to be a very safe and reliable source of drinking water.  We continue to actively monitor this situation and will update our customers of any future notices via social media and our website.

COVID-19 Update

Posted by on Mar 13, 2020 in GeneralInfo, News, Slider | Comments Off on COVID-19 Update

COVID-19 Update

03/22/2020

The LCWSC has decided to close our office to the public in an effort to protect our employees and the community from the spread of the COVID-19 virus.  Effective Monday, March 23rd until Friday, April 10th, we will be operating with a reduced and rotating staff and limit our work to those activities that are absolutely necessary.  This time period could extend if the COVID-19 virus remains a public health risk that it is today.

During this time, we will not have a person working the drive-thru or answering phones on a regular basis.   We will return messages for customer service needs such as new service requests or request to transfer service. However, no new taps will be made until we return to normal operations. Please call our office at 864-682-3250 and press 2 to leave a message for our customer service department or email us at contact@lcwsc.com. Be sure to leave your full name, a phone number where you may be reached, and an account number if you have one.  We will attempt to return calls but ask for your patience and understanding as we have limited staff to return phone calls in a timely manner.  

You can continue to mail your payment to our post office box 1006 or call our office at 864-682-3250 and press 4 to use our no-cost pay by phone system.  You may also visit our website at lcwsc.com to pay online.  If none of these options will work for you, you can use the lock box adjacent to our drive thru.

For emergency water or sewer leaks, please call our office and press 7.

If you need utility lines located at your property, please call our office and press 3 or call PUPS directly at 811.  You will need to provide the exact location of the area that needs to be located. 

We are sorry that this decision may be inconvenient for some but taking these additional steps to minimize the impacts of COVID-19 will better protect the health and safety of our employees so LCWSC can ensure water and sewer service throughout this national emergency. 

Thank you and God Bless. 

03/18/2020

Currently our office is closed to the public due to the COVID-19 virus, but our drive thru remains open.  Should the need arise to close our drive thru window, there are more ways to pay your bill that are FREE to all LCWSC customers.

FREE ways to pay your LCWSC Bill

  • Online at www.LCWSC.com
  • Pay by phone toll free at 1-855-964-6743
  • Bank Draft from checking account – call customer service or find the form on our website
  • Recurring credit/debit card payments – call customer service or sign up on our website
  • Mail checks or money order to
    • LCWSC – PO Box 1006 – Laurens SC 29360
  • Drop Box – located at our office drive thru – customers are discouraged from leaving cash in the drop box.

If you have any questions, please contact a customer service representative at 864-682-3250.

03/15/2020

In an effort to protect our employees and to minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the Laurens County Water and Sewer Commission (LCWSC) is closing its office to the public effective immediately.  During this time, you can continue to pay your bill online, by phone, by mail or at our drive thru.  For all other customer service needs, including signing up for service please call our office at (864) 682-3250 or email us at contact@lcwsc.com.  We understand that this decision may create an inconvenience for some, but we ask for your patience and understanding during this time. 

We do not expect these proactive steps or the COVID-19 to have an impact on our ability to provide water and sewer service to our customers.  As stated in our previous post, the disinfection and filtration process used in treating drinking water destroys and removes all viruses as required by the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency; therefore, your public water supply continues to be a very safe and reliable source of drinking water.  We continue to actively monitor this situation and will update our customers of any future notices via social media and our website.

03/13/2020

The Laurens County Water and Sewer Commission is actively monitoring COVID-19. 

We know that COVID-19 is a concern for many people in our region and around the globe and we are doing everything we can to help combat the spread of the virus. 

Our office located at 3850 Highway 221 South remains open, but customers are strongly encouraged to utilize online bill pay or to call our customer service representatives to pay by phone.  If you need any other customer service assistance, please call our office at (864) 682-3250 or email us at contact@lcwsc.com.  Additionally, our staff has been encouraged to make efforts to minimize social interaction as much as possible as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  We recognize that this may affect the high level of customer service you expect from us.   However, taking these precautions will help avoid the potential spread of the virus and ensure the safety of our workforce and our customers. 

Filtration and disinfection processes used in treating drinking water are effective in the removal of all viruses as required by the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency.   We do not anticipate COVID-19 causing any disruption to water service for our customers. 

Our website, phone system and social media platforms will be updated as necessary with any alerts or office closure notices. 

Welcome Town of Gray Court Customers

Posted by on Dec 13, 2019 in GeneralInfo, News, Slider | Comments Off on Welcome Town of Gray Court Customers

Welcome Town of Gray Court Customers

Welcome to LCWSC!  Beginning January 1, 2020 LCWSC will manage the water system and billing for the Town of Gray Court.  After this date, you will begin receiving a bill from LCWSC for your water service and garbage service.

Business Information

  • LCWSC Office is located at 3850 Hwy 221 South, Laurens SC 29360
  • Mailing Address:  LCWSC, PO Box 1006, Laurens SC 29360
  • Office Hours:  Monday – Friday, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
  • Phone:  864-682-3250
  • Website:  www.LCWSC.com

Once you receive your first bill from LCWSC, you will be assigned a new account number.  LCWSC offers many ways to pay your bill and you can choose what is convenient to you. 

  • Pay your bill online at www.LCWSC.com – to sign in, you will need your new account number, the phone number that was on file with the Town of Gray Court.  Once you complete the online form with this information, you will receive and email verification.  You must click the link in the email to verify you account, then you will be able to log in to view or pay your bill.
  • Pay your bill by phone – dial toll free 855-964-6743, you will need your new 7-digit account number.  Just use all digits of the account number without the dash.  This service will talk you through paying your bill, but please do not attempt to use on speakerphone. 
  • Pay your bill by bank draft – This service available with signed permission by the customer.  The monthly bill can be withdrawn from a customer’s checking account on the due date of the bill.  To utilize this service LCWSC would require a voided copy of the check and a signed bank draft form.  This form is available on our website under Customer Service, Bank Draft Forms.
  • Pay your bill by recurring credit or debit card – By choosing this service, the monthly bill can be charged to the credit or debit card automatically on the due date of the bill.  You can sign up for this service online or call a representative to sign up. 
  • Pay your bill by mail – You can mail a check or money order to the LCWSC mailing address.
  • Pay your bill in person at the LCWSC office – We can accept many forms of payment, including: cash, check, Money Order, Visa, Mastercard or Discover.  We do not accept American Express.
  • Pay your bill in person at the Town of Gray Court – You may pay by cash or check only at the Town Hall Office.  Subject to availability, please contact Gray Court Town Hall for hours of operation.
  • Night Drop Box – We have a drop box located at the drive thru at the LCWSC office and outside the Town of Gray Court office.  Customers are discouraged from leaving cash in the night drop box, as LCWSC will not be responsible if the cash is lost or stolen.

Late Payments – A 10% penalty is added to the bill on the 16th day after the statement date. Water service will be turned off and locked without further notice if the bill is not paid within 25 days of the statement date.

Service Reconnection – If LCWSC turns off service for non-payment, the customer must pay the outstanding bill plus a $45.00 delinquent fee before services will be restored. Services are restored only during normal business hours of 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Payments must be made with cash, credit card or money order. Customers are discouraged from leaving cash in the night deposit box.  LCWSC will not be responsible if the cash is lost or stolen.

Rental Property Owners – Rental property owners and managers should contact LCWSC when a customer moves into or out of the rental property.  This will allow LCWSC to keep its records current and insure that bills are sent to the appropriate person.  If you own a rental property, please contact LCWSC to ensure the ownership records are correct.

Billing Schedule for 2020 – LCWSC billing schedules are predetermined based on geographic service area and cannot be changed to accommodate individual requests.  Please use this as a guide to the schedule for billing your area.  Dates could be subject to change without notice. 

Month Bill Date Due Date
January 1/9/2020 1/24/2020
Feb 2/6/2020 2/21/2020
March 3/5/2020 3/20/2020
April 4/9/2020 4/24/2020
May 5/7/2020 5/22/2020
June 6/4/2020 6/19/2020
July 7/9/2020 7/24/2020
August 8/6/2020 8/21/2020
Sept 9/10/2020 9/25/2020
Oct 10/8/2020 10/23/2020
Nov 11/5/2020 11/20/2020
Dec 12/3/2020 12/18/2020

Your new LCWSC Bill – Your bill will have a new look!  Below are points of interest and an example of what your new bill will look like.

Water Quality Issues for Western Laurens Customers

Posted by on Jul 17, 2019 in GeneralInfo, News | Comments Off on Water Quality Issues for Western Laurens Customers

Potential Taste and Odor Water Problem (For Customers in Western Laurens County Only)

The Laurens County Water and Sewer Commission (LCWSC) is receiving calls concerning an earthy taste and/or smell in the potable water from residents living in parts of western Laurens County (Hwy 252 and Hwy 76 vicinity), the area that receives water the LCWSC purchases from the Laurens CPW.    

The Laurens CPW issued the following statement to GoLaurens.com on July 29, 2019:

It appears that the water in Lake Rabon is getting worse. Lab results indicated that the level of geosmin in the lake has increased significantly from 33 ng/L (nanograms/liter) on July 8 to 434 ng/L on July 24. The level at which humans can taste and smell geosmin is 7-10 ng/L.

We have been working with consultants and suppliers to identify the most effective treatment process to deal with the geosmin. As a result, we hope to start introducing a product called Earth Tech. We asked S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control last Wednesday for a temporary permit on this process and we hope to hear from them this week.

In addition to this, we have been testing various types and quantities of carbon. One variety called Hydrodarco, manufactured by the Cabot Corporation, seemed to work best at removing geosmin. It reduced the level from 432 ng/L to 35.6 ng/L. While that is still in the detectable range for humans (7-10 ng/L), we think a combination of this and the Earth Tech will finally solve the problem. We are in the process of ordering the carbon and engineering the delivery system. All of which will need an additional permit from SCDHEC.

Again, we apologize for the length of time this process has taken. Please be assured that all available resources are being devoted to solving this problem. We ask for continued patience while we work through this event.

_____________________________________________________________________________

The Laurens CPW issued the following press release on July 16, 2019:

Laurens CPW Water Quality Issue Press Release

Laurens, S.C. – The Laurens CPW received the independent lab’s tests results late yesterday regarding the recent water quality issue. The test results indicate that there are high levels of Geosmin in the water at Lake Rabon. Geosmin is an organic compound with a distinct earthy flavor and aroma produced by certain microorganisms. It is commonly present in most lakes and ponds at varying levels. It is responsible for the earthy scent that occurs in the air when rain falls after a dry spell of weather or when soil is disturbed. Geosmin can be detected by humans at very low levels. It produces a musty, earthy smell and taste in drinking water, however it is not harmful in drinking water.

“The last time we had a major Geosmin issue was back in 2009. The levels were much higher back then and consequently, the taste and odor was much worse”, said John Young, CPW general manager. “ We suspect that alternating heavy rains and very high temperatures in recent weeks account for the rise in Geosmin in the lake. We understand how disruptive this problem has been. We ask everyone to please remain patient with us we work through this situation.”, Young went on to say.

Having determined the source of the problem, the CPW now plans to implement changes in its treatment process to remedy the situation. “We are working with our suppliers and consultants to determine the specific type of carbon that we need and the dosage required to treat the Geosmin, said Will Patterson, CPW Water/Sewer Superintendent. “If we use the wrong treatment process or use dosages too high or too low, we could make the problem even worse”, Patterson went on to say.

LCWSC would like to stress that Geosmin is not harmful in drinking water and that the water is safe, although some of our customers will likely find it disagreeable. 

We regret the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as the Laurens CPW works to correct this problem.  We will post updates as they become available

Please see the map of the LCWSC service area that may be affected by Geosmin.

Boil Water Advisory and Repeal

Posted by on Dec 12, 2018 in GeneralInfo, News | Comments Off on Boil Water Advisory and Repeal

Boil Water Advisory and Repeal

Live Love Lake

Posted by on Mar 23, 2017 in GeneralInfo, News | Comments Off on Live Love Lake

Live Love Lake

Click here for more information

Potential Brown Water Problem

Posted by on Oct 24, 2016 in GeneralInfo, News | Comments Off on Potential Brown Water Problem

Potential Brown Water Problem

(For Customers in Western Laurens County Only)

Update 11/11/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.  We have been able to flush the discolored water from the majority of our system and continue to flush the secondary roads and neighborhoods.  We plan to continue to post updates on Fridays, so please be sure to check our facebook page or website for updated information.

Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule:  november-11-2016-flushing-plan

If you live on a road that is colored blue in the map but are experiencing discolored water, please try the steps below.  If the discolored water persists, please notify one of our team members.  You may email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting.  If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your continued patience as we work to correct this problem.

Update 11/4/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.  We have been able to flush the discolored water from the majority of our system and continue to flush the secondary roads and neighborhoods.  We plan to continue to post updates on Fridays, so please be sure to check our facebook page or website for updated information.

Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule:  november-4-2016-flushing-plan

If you live on a road that is colored blue in the map but are experiencing discolored water, please try the steps below.  If the discolored water persists, please notify one of our team members.  You may email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting.  If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your continued patience as we work to correct this problem.

Update 10/28/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.  We have been able to flush the discolored water from the majority of our system and continue to flush the secondary roads and neighborhoods.  We plan to continue to post updates on Fridays, so please be sure to check our facebook page or website for updated information.

Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule:  october-28-2016-flushing-plan

If you live on a road that is colored blue in the map but are experiencing discolored water, please try the steps below.  If the discolored water persists, please notify one of our team members.  You may email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting.  If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your continued patience as we work to correct this problem.

 

Update 10/24/16

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.  We have been able to flush the discolored water from the large main lines and are currently flushing the secondary roads and neighborhoods. Our progress on 10/22 and 10/23 was greater than expected and we are updating the map at this time. We plan to continue to post updates on Fridays, so please be sure to check our Facebook page or website for updated information.

Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule:  October-24-2016-Flushing-Plan

If you live on a road that is colored blue in the map but are experiencing discolored water, please try the steps below.  If the discolored water persists, please notify one of our team members.  You may email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting.  If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  1. Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes.  This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  2. If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  3. You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  4. If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes.  This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your continued patience as we work to correct this problem.

Update 10/21/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.  We have been able to flush the discolored water from most of the large main lines that supply water to secondary roads and neighborhoods.  We plan to continue to post updates on Fridays, so please be sure to check our facebook page or website for updated information.

Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule:  october-21-2016-flushing-plan

If you live on a road that is colored blue in the map but are experiencing discolored water, please try the steps below.  If the discolored water persists, please notify one of our team members.  You may email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting.  If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your continued patience as we work to correct this problem.

Update 10/14/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.  We have been able to flush the discolored water from most of the large main lines that supply water to secondary roads and neighborhoods.  Currently we plan to post updates on Fridays, so please be sure to check our Facebook page or website for updated information.

Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule:   October 14, 2016

If you live on a road that is colored blue in the map but are experiencing discolored water, please try the steps below.  If the discolored water persists, please notify one of our team members.  You may email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting.  If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  1. Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes.  This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  2. If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  3. You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  4. If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes.  This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your continued patience as we work to correct this problem.

 

Update 10/10/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation. We have been able to flush the discolored water from most of the large main lines that supply water to secondary roads and neighborhoods. We will transition to posting weekly updates on the progress and flushing schedule. Currently we plan to post updates on Fridays, so please be sure to check our facebook page or website for updated information.

Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule: october102016flushing

If you live on a road that is colored blue in the map but are experiencing discolored water, please try the steps below. If the discolored water persists, please notify one of our team members. You may email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting. If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your continued patience as we work to correct this problem.

 

Update 10/9/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.

Our flushing efforts are continuing to reduce the amount of discolored water in our system.  The LCWSC will continue to flush throughout the remainder of the weekend in an effort to eliminate the discolored water from our water lines.  Some areas of the water distribution system have already been flushed.  Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule: sunday-morning-flushing-update

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

The LCWSC will have crew members working to flush remaining areas of the water distribution system and we will continue to work on this issue.

We are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as we work to correct this problem. We will post updates as they become available to let customers know the progress we are making to remedy the situation.

Update 10/8/16:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.

Our flushing efforts over the last 48 hours are continuing to reduce the amount of discolored water in our system.  The LCWSC will continue to flush throughout the weekend in an effort to eliminate the discolored water from our water lines.  Some areas of the water distribution system have already been flushed.  Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule: saturday-morning-flushing-update

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

The LCWSC will have crew members working to flush remaining areas of the water distribution system and we will continue to work on this issue.

We are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as we work to correct this problem. We will post updates as they become available to let customers know the progress we are making to remedy the situation.

Update 10/7/16 Afternoon:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.

Our flushing efforts over the last 24 hours have significantly reduced the amount of discolored water in our system.  The LCWSC will continue to flush throughout the weekend to eliminate the discolored water from our water lines.  Some areas of the water distribution system have already been flushed. Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule: weekend-flushing-plan

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

The LCWSC will have crew members working to flush remaining areas of the water distribution system and we will continue to work on this issue.

We are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as we work to correct this problem. We will post updates as they become available to let customers know the progress we are making to remedy the situation.

Update 10/7/16 Morning:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation.

Our flushing efforts overnight have significantly reduced the amount of discolored water in our system. The LCWSC will continue to flush throughout the day to eliminate the discolored water from our water lines. Some areas of the water distribution system have been flushed overnight. Please click here to see a map of the progress and schedule: flushing-10-7-2016

Once we complete water main flushing for the road you live on, there are a few steps that LCWSC recommends to clear personal service lines.

  • Run cold water using a high flow faucet (such as an outside hose bib or bath tub) for a few minutes. We suggest trying this for no longer than 5 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should quickly remove the discolored water from your service line and plumbing.
  • If the water becomes clear, then briefly flush each of the remaining faucets in your home.
  • You may also want to run one or two washing machine cycles without clothes to clear any discolored water that may be in the lines that feed to the washing machine.
  • If you notice discolored water while running the hot water, you may need to flush your water heater. If you are unsure how to flush the water heater, you can run hot water in the bath tub for around 10-15 minutes. This will only use a few cents worth of water and should remove the discolored water from the heater tank.

The LCWSC will have crew members working to flush remaining areas of the water distribution system. We are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as we work to correct this problem. We will post updates as they become available to let customers know the progress we are making to remedy the situation.

Update 10/6/16 Afternoon:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation. We are now seeing clear water enter our system from the Laurens CPW ground storage tank behind Laurens High School. The LCWSC has begun to aggressively flush our water lines. Please see the attached map for a tentative schedule of flushing in the affected areas.

We are focusing our efforts on the large main lines along Hwy 76, Hwy 252 and Hwy 221 to get the discolored water out of our system as quickly as possible and plan to continue flushing throughout the night.

Again, we are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as we work to correct this problem. We will post updates as they become available to let customers know the progress we are making to remedy the situation.

Please click here to view a map of the tentative flushing schedule: flushing plan

Update 10/6/16 Morning:

The LCWSC would like to update our customers on this developing situation. The Laurens CPW was able to get clear water entering the ground storage tank behind Laurens High School overnight. The LCWSC believes that by early afternoon the water entering our system should be clear. It is important to understand this is an estimated time frame.

Once the water entering our system is clear, we will begin aggressively flushing our water lines. This process can take some time to complete, but we will focus our first efforts on larger main lines along Hwy 76, Hwy 252 and Hwy 221. Many LCWSC crew members are ready to work as long as needed to begin the process of flushing the discolored water from our system.

If you experience discolored water the LCWSC recommends that you minimize the use of your hot water as discolored water could accumulate in your hot water tank and require that you flush the tank after this event has passed. We would also discourage you from washing whites if at all possible to minimize staining.

We are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as we work to correct this problem. We will post updates as they become available to let customers know what we are doing to remedy the situation.

Please click here to view a map of the affected area: potential-brown-water-area

10/5/16

The LCWSC is receiving calls concerning brown-water from residents living in parts of western Laurens County (Hwy 252 and Hwy 76 vicinity), the area that receives water treated by the Laurens CPW. From what we are being told at this time, the Laurens CPW had a valve malfunction at the ground storage tank behind the Laurens High School – the tank that serves part of the LCWSC water system. CPW has made repairs to the valve but these repairs have resulted in allowing brown water from that tank to enter our distribution system. The CPW is working to empty and refill the water in their tank but the time it will take to complete this process is unknown. To complicate matters, we cannot begin to aggressively flush our system until the CPW tank is back online and full of clear water. We can assure you that we will begin flushing to remove any brown water in our system as soon as possible.

The discolored water from the CPW is a holdover from the manganese problem they experienced in August. The water is safe but we realize consumption will depend greatly on how discolored the water is at your home. If you experience discolored water the LCWSC recommends that you minimize the use of your hot water as discolored water could accumulate in your hot water tank and require that you flush the tank after this event has passed. We would also discourage you from washing whites if at all possible to minimize staining.

We are very sorry for the significant inconvenience this event has and will cause and appreciate your patience as we work to correct this problem. We will post updates as they become available to let customers know what we are doing to remedy the situation.

Please email contact@lcwsc.com with your name, address and phone number so we may track and better identify the area where the problem is persisting. If you do not have access to email call our office during normal business hours at 864-682-3250.

Hexavalent Chromium and the Unregulated Contaminant Rule

Posted by on Sep 27, 2016 in News | Comments Off on Hexavalent Chromium and the Unregulated Contaminant Rule

The LCWSC water system, along with other water systems across the nation, was sampled during 2014 as part of the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 3 (UCMR3). The EPA uses the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring (UCM) program to collect data for contaminants suspected to be present in drinking water, but that do not have health-based standards set under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Every five years EPA reviews the list of contaminants, largely based on the Contaminant Candidate List.

The EPA will evaluate the information gathered, as well as potential health effects studies, to determine if regulatory limits are needed. Collecting information about the occurrence of these compounds in water supplies is the first step in the EPA’s efforts to determine whether they should be regulated.

As a result of the above sampling there was a recent article publish by EWG (Environmental Working Group) regarding the presence of hexavalent chromium in US drinking water systems, including Laurens County. This article was posted to local media outlets and shared by some Laurens County residents via Facebook. Hexavalent chromium is both naturally occurring and/or a result of industrial discharge activities. It can be found at various levels in public water systems, and possibly private wells and bottle water. The following is an American Water Works Association link which provides further information about hexavalent chromium.

http://www.drinktap.org/water-info/whats-in-my-water/hexavalent-chromium.aspx

Levels of hexavalent chromium in the LCWSC drinking water are far below the current EPA limit for total chromium of 100 ppb. Furthermore, in the future if the EPA decides to implement maximum contaminate limits (MCL) specific to hexavalent chromium it will more than likely follow the 2014 standard set by the state of California, which is 10 ppb. The levels in the LCWSC water system are 50 times lower than even this more stringent limit.

Our UCMR results, which were included in our 2014 Consumer Confidence Water Quality Report, is below. For results from this and other annual Water Quality Reports, please visit our web-site at http://lcwsc.com/consumer-confidence-report/ .

ucmr-press-release-final_page_table

  • The presence of a compound does not necessarily mean there is a health risk. The concentration of a compound is a far more important factor in determining potential health implications. Results for the UCMR3 testing are measured in “part per billion” (ppb) increments.  An easier way to understand the concept of a “part per billion” is to consider it in the context of a few examples.  A part per billion is also:
    • 1 penny in 10 million dollars
    • 1 second in 32 years
    • 1 foot of a trip to the moon
    • 1 blade of grass on a football field
    • 1 drop of water in an Olympic-size swimming pool

The LCWSC is fully committed to protecting public health and ensuring your water meets or surpasses all state and federal health standards for tap water.  If at any time our water fails to meet federal or state drinking water standards, we will notify our customers and take all necessary actions to correct the problem immediately. If you have further concerns or questions do not hesitate to call our office 864-682-3250.

 

Capital Rate Plan

Posted by on Jun 30, 2016 in News | Comments Off on Capital Rate Plan

Year 3 of this plan begins July 1, 2016

 

For several years, the Laurens County Water and Sewer Commission (LCWSC) has been working to build a water treatment facility on Lake Greenwood. Given the magnitude and complexity of this type of project, it can take many years for visible progress to take shape. That is about to change in a significant way, as we will start construction of this facility in the next 3 to 5 years. In an effort to keep our customers informed about this important project, we’ve outlined some additional information to better explain how we got to this point in the process. As we reach milestones over the next 5 years, more updates on this project will be made available via our website and local media. With each milestone, we hope our customers will have a growing sense of pride in their new water treatment facility; and more importantly, a growing confidence that their children and grandchildren will have access to a reliable, high-quality drinking water source.

Why does LCWSC need to build a water treatment plant?

As the largest water provider in Laurens County, LCWSC supplies water for all unincorporated areas in Laurens County as well as parts of southern Greenville County. We serve nearly 40,000 residents through 14,000 water taps. While most of our customer base is residential, we are experiencing industrial and commercial growth in the northern part of the County. This growth is beneficial for creating more jobs, which in turn leads to more residential development. We expect this trend to spread across our County, significantly increasing our water demand.

Is Laurens County prepared for growth?

Currently, the County’s water source is either Lake Rabon or the Enoree River. Based on a comprehensive Water Resources Master Plan performed by United Research Services (URS) Corporation in 2009, both sources have a combined reliable capacity of 14 million gallons per day (MGD). While this may sound like a lot, the current maximum daily water demand in Laurens County can reach as high as 8 MGD, more than half of this available capacity. As more large industries choose Laurens County and we experience an increase in population, we will exceed our capacity. For comparison, Greenwood County, with roughly the same population as Laurens County, has a water treatment facility rated at 30 MGD.

Why choose Lake Greenwood as a water source?

As part of the Water Resources Master Plan, URS Corporation examined every available reservoir greater than 50 acres, as well as the source of water for these reservoirs. The Saluda River was identified as our most reliable water source, as no other rivers or reservoirs would be sustainable beyond a 50-year planning period. By utilizing Lake Greenwood as the location of our water plant, we will also benefit from the Reedy River, another very reliable water source.

Why do we have to build this treatment plant now?

It is necessary that we proceed with this project now, instead of delaying it another 5 or 10 years, for several reasons. First, the City of Laurens Commission of Public Works (CPW) and the City of Clinton have aging water plants. While both plants have been well maintained and operated, they face potential challenges in meeting future, more stringent regulations. Second, as the largest user of both facilities, LCWSC would provide primary funding for any capital improvements made to either of the existing facilities. Therefore, investing in a new facility using a more sustainable source is a better use of our funds.

How will LCWSC pay for such an important, but large project?

The property for the water plant and the site for the intake structure on Lake Greenwood have already been purchased. Phase I of the project, estimated at $500,000, will consist of State and Federal permitting, securing Greenwood County approval, and preliminary design. This will be done on a pay-as-you go basis over the next 3 to 5 years. Phase II, estimated at $30,000,000, will involve the final design and construction. This will be funded through a 30-year loan resulting in an increase in annual debt service of approximately $1,300,000. Because we will no longer purchase water from the CPW and the City of Clinton, LCWSC will save approximately $1,000,000 per year. These savings will be used to offset the cost of operating the new treatment plant. Therefore, the increase in debt service requires additional revenue that will be funded by an increase in user fees (capital rate increase).

With an average monthly water bill of $29.97, LCWSC currently has one of the lowest unincorporated rates in the Upstate. Only one water rate increase has occurred during the last 10 years. The proposed capital rate increase would be implemented over the course of 5 years through five phases, beginning July 1, 2014 and concluding July 1, 2018.

  • Phase I (July 1, 2014): Reduce gallons included in a minimum bill to 500 gallons.
  • Phase II (July 1, 2015): Integrate a 3% increase in volume fees.
  • Phase III (July 1, 2016): Eliminate all gallons included in the minimum.
  • Phase IV (July 1, 2017): Integrate a 3% increase in volume fees.
  • Phase V (July 1, 2018): Integrate a 3% increase in volume fees.

The projected total increase after 5 years is $6.74 per month, or an average increase of 4.5% over 5 years. This is a very modest rate increase to secure a long-term, sustainable water source that will be invaluable to future generations of Laurens County.

The table below illustrates each phase and the corresponding monthly bill based on an average usage of 4,050 gallons per month, a typical monthly usage for our customers.

Current Bill July 2014 July 2015 July 2016 July 2017 July 2018 Total Increase
Average Bill $29.97 $32.42 $32.95 $35.47 $36.08 $36.72 $6.74
Minimum $15.00 $15.00 $15.00 $15.00 $15.00 $15.00
$/1000 $4.90 $4.90 $5.05 $5.05 $5.20 $5.35

 

For further information on this important project, please call our office at 864-682-3250.